14.01.2016

„Continuous Catalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Chemical Fuels and Operando Spectroscopic Investigations” - seminarium ACMiN


Akademickie Centrum Materiałów i Nanotechnologii AGH zaprasza na seminarium, które odbędzie się 14 stycznia 2016 r. o godz. 15.00.

 

Referat pt. „Continuous Catalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Chemical Fuels and Operando Spectroscopic Investigations” wygłosi dr Atsushi Urakawa (Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Tarragona, Spain).

 

Miejsce: ul. Kawiory 30, bud. D-16, sala audytoryjna ACMiN (1.02A).

„Continuous Catalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Chemical Fuels and Operando Spectroscopic Investigations”

Besides the great advances in CO2 sequestration technologies, CO2 utilization and particularly artificial “carbon-recycling” have gained considerable attention to close the carbon cycle which has presently an open end due to the slowness of converting CO2 into fossil fuels by natural processes. One of the most promising paths to covert a large amount of captured CO2 is its catalytic conversion to useful and especially largely demanded chemicals like fuels. In this presentation, two unique approaches we have chosen for efficient continuous catalytic conversion of CO2 to chemical fuels will be presented together with spectroscopic investigation of the catalyst materials under working “operando” conditions.
In the first part, high-pressure approach (up to 400 bar) to synthesize methanol by means of CO2 hydrogenation to benefit from both kinetics and thermodynamics will be described, yielding outstanding catalytic performance of >95% CO2 conversion with >98% methanol selectivity with the highest methanol weight time yield reported to date. Also, our attempts to learn about the electronic state of active metal (Cu) by XAFS under operando, high-pressure and high-temperature, conditions will be described. Furthermore, operando visual inspection of catalyst and deactivation mechanism will be presented during the high-pressure synthesis of another CO2 conversion reaction, dimethyl carbonate (DMC) synthesized from CO2 and methanol over CeO2 using an organic dehydrating agent. The work clearly shows that seeing (visually) is worth more than a number of catalytic tests to understand and optimize the catalytic process.
In the second part, our recent attempts to combine CO2 capture and reduction processes by means of unsteady-state operation will be described, targeting at the synthesis of pure syngas from diluted CO2 (flue gas). Catalytically active sites and species in the reaction were elucidated by space- and time-resolved DRIFTS, XAFS, and XRD to gain holistic views on the catalyst materials and also chemical gradients along the catalyst bed.