Physical sciences

1. Nonlinear memory elements of fractional order

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. Konrad Szaciłowski

Auxiliary supervisor: dr Kacper Pilarczyk

Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology

Summary of research problem: Memristors are unique electronic elements: they are classified as passive elements (they can dissipate energy and are not sources of current) and have memory features. These features make the memristors the prospective building blocks for the computers of the future. The existence of memristors was predicted on the basis of electromagnetic theories in the 1970s, but it was only in the 21st century that the first imperfect practical realizations of memristive elements have been reported. Memristors are a great scientific challenge, because they elude the exact mathematical description - there is a significant discrepancy between theory and the observed properties. This is due to the fact that the materials, in which the memory effects are observed, are strongly disordered. That is reason why the concept of a memfractor (a fractional order memristor)has appeared in the literature.The matematic description of this element is more complex, but the predictions of this theoretical model are much closer to reality. The aim of this project is to study the memfractors - highly disordered semiconducting structures with memory features - using experimental and theoretical methods. Such a bilateral approach to this difficult topic should allow for a better understanding of memory phenomena in materials and the development of an accurate theory of new electronic components.

Research facilities: The laboratory at Academic Centre of Materials and Nanotechnology is fully equipped with research instruments required for each step of the project except of some elements for construction of memristor/memfractor system for signal processing.

Number of places: 2

 

2. Spin-valley properties of multielectron quantum dots

Supervisor: dr hab. inż. Marcin Sikora

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Michał Nowak

Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology

Summary of research problem: The purpose of the work is to provide theoretical predictions about the properties of multi-electron quantum dots, in which charge carriers have both spin and valley degrees of freedom. This research is motivated by recent developments in the creation of nanostructures covering both: silicon quantum dots [Nature Commun. 10, 1063 (2019)] and self-assembled dots in the monoatomic layers of transition metal dichalcogenides [Nanoscale Adv. 1, 643 (2019)]. As part of the project, the effective mass and tight binding approaches will be used to describe the electronic structure of the dots. A few-electron effects will be included in numerically exact approach of configuration interaction method. Investigation of spin-valley coupling in multielectron systems will allow to refer to i.a. experiments investigating the transfer of electrons in quantum registers defined on a series of quantum dots. In a multi-orbital tight binding model, the luminescence spectrum of the monoatomic quantum dots in transition metal dichalcogenides will be described.

Research facilities: The conducted theoretical studies will use advanced numerical calculations exploiting tight binding and configuration interaction approach. We will use both the computational code developed by the student and the KWANT package. The Academic Center of Materials and Nanotechnology will provide the computing power of the medium (dedicated for the implementation of the project, rack computing servers with a remote access environment) and high (TeraACMiN supercomputer) power. In addition, the ACK Cyfronet infrastructure will be used - Prometheus supercomputer. As part of the research, the state-of-the-art methods for parallel calculations will be used. The PhD topic will be the subject of the NCN grants application. If the funding is obtained, the student will be directly involved in the realization of the grant (with an extra stipend) and will have the opportunity to take a foreign internship.

Number of places: 1

 

3. Superconductivity, topology, and strong electronic correlations in twisted bilayer graphene

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. Józef Spałek

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Michał Zegrodnik

Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology

Summary of research problem: Recent discovery of superconductivity and Mott insulating state in a system consisting of two adjacent graphene layers twisted by a so-called magic angle has attracted much attention of the scientific community [1]. The specific orientation of the graphene layers results in the creation of a Moiré pattern with a very narrow low energy bands in the electronic structure. This last feature points to a significant role of inter-electronic interactions when it comes to the unconventional features of the material – a situation similar to the one known from the strongly correlated electron systems (e.g., high-temperature superconductors). Theoretical description of the twisted bilayer graphene system is still at the initial stage of development and many aspects require a detailed analysis. The proposed project focuses on the modelling of graphene bilayers with the inclusion of the strong electronic correlation effects with particular emphasis placed on the description of the superconducting state and its relationship with the Mott physics. The analysis will mainly be carried within the description based on the tight binding type of models taking into account different pairing symmetries. In addition, it is planned to examine the topological properties of both the superconducting phase and the insulating phase, as well as the possibility of purely orbital magnetic phase which is believed to appear in the considered system.

Research facilities: Research has a theoretical character with the use of both existing numerical software and self-prepared codes. Also, analitical analysis of the theoretical models is going to be carried out. Direct access to the high performance cluster „TeraACMiN” is provided in ACMiN AGH where the project is going to be executed. Also, if needed access to the „Prometeus” supercomputer can be obtained through proper grant in CYFRONET centre. Additional founding of the project is planned to be obtained within the grant from the National Science Centre (proper grant application is going to be submitted in the second half of the year 2019).

Number of places: 1

 

4. Chemical Analyses of Particulate Matter together with Identification and Evaluation of Contribution of Their Sources.

Supervisor: dr hab. inż. Zdzisław Stęgowski

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Lucyna Samek

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: In the frame of the realization of work a samples of particulate matter will be collected. The chemical content of particulate matter will be determined. Elemental concentration will be done using fluorescence technique as well as ions concentrations will be determined by ion chromatography. The results of chemical analyses will be used for source modeling of particulate matter (Their identification and contribution to PM) PCA and MLRA as well as PMF methods will be used for sources modeling.

Research facilities: The Medical Physics and Biophysics Department X-ray laboratory is equipped with an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. In addition, it has the samplers for collecting air pollutants. It is possible to perform ions analysis on the liquid chromatograph of the Faculty of Energy and Fuels. Realization of IAEA International Atomic Energy Agency regional project ( European and Asian countries) and project with Laboratory of Atmospheric Chemistry, Paul Scherrer Institut,5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland is planned.

Number of places: 1

 

5. Impact of Cu doping on the electronic states of 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. inż. Andrzej Kozłowski

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Topological insulators (TI) represent a new type of quantum matter: in bulk it insulates while the surface conducts. Metallic surface states, with linear, Dirac, dispersion relation are topologically protected by time reversal symmetry. As a consequence, no backscattering is present in case of nonmagnetic dopands, what is very attractive for spintronics (sophisticated clean conditions may not be requited in microstructure preparation) and also have a chance to be implemented in quantum computers (lower decoherence). The main techniques to confirm nontrivial topology are: angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and the analysis of quantum oscillations in electronic transport Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations (SdH). The aim of studies will be to check the impact of Cu doping on single crystalline topological 3D insulator. The samples will have composition of 2,5 % do 15 % Cu versus Bi content. We expect that Cu doping will cause the transition from nontrivial to trivial topology and this transition we plan to study. The problem will be even more attractive since Bi2-xCuxSe3 superconducts for a for certain Cu concentration. In the first stage of crucial studies, magnetoresistance measurements in temperature range from 100 mK to 30 K and in magnetic field up to 14 T will be performed. Here we expect to observe SdH oscillations and to draw the Berry phase, i.e. to confirm nontrivial topology. It will also be checked if the material became superconducting. The next step will be to perform scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) for the surface topography observation, as well as STS to check how surface electronic structure is affected by Cu dopands. Both STM and STS will be measured in the temperature range from 40K to room temperature. The obtained results will constitute an important part of the efforts aimed to create nano scale device based on nontrivial properties of topological electronic states.

Research facilities: The initial sample characterization (e.g. XRD) will be performed in Solid State Physics Department (where both promoter and the auxiliary promoter are employed), while XAS and XPEEM (aimed to measure dopand content and how they sit close to the surface) we plan to measure in dedicated line in Solaris synchrotron. Magnetoresistance measurements at milikelwin temperatures and at high magnetic field, crucial for the project, will be performed on the 3He/4He dilution refrigerated „Triton” in ACMIN. The experimental setup is equipped with data acquisition system Nanonis-Tramea, unique in Poland and specially designed for quantum signal studies (i.e. giving highest possible signal-to-noise ratio). The other cycle of measurements will be performed on STM commonly used by Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science and ACMIN, both in AGH UST. For milikelvin magnetotransport measurements sophisticated electric contacts are required; also those contacts will be made in ACMIN. For both experimental setups and also to the lab where electric contacts are made, both promoter and auxiliary promoter, as well as a PhD student will have and easy access. If possible it is planned to perform ARPES measurements in dedicated line in Solaris synchrotron – the aim of this studies will be to characterize density of states on samples surface.

Number of places: 2

 

6. Studies of stoichiometric and doped magnetite ground state: measurements at milikelvin temperatures and ab-initio calculations.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. inż. Zbigniew Kąkol

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Magnetite Fe3O4 became a model material for solid state physics because all main interactions are present there resulting in both ferrimagnetic to paramagnetic phase transition at TC=825 K (first magnet known by the mankind) and the insulator to metal Verwey transition when T exceeds TV=125 K. At T > 125 K stoichiometric magnetite has cubic Fd3m symmetry: Fe ions in tetrahedral sites are in 3+ state that does not change when T lowers below TV; in octahedral positions the mean valence is 2.5+. In low-T structure, monoclinic Cc, these octahedral atoms group into characteristic cigar-like structures, trimerons, with Fe roughly of 2.35+ or 2.65+ valance. Among many spectacular phenomena related to magnetite, the change of the Verwey transition order from discontinuous (I order) to a second order, was not analyzed in details. The transfer from I to II order transition can be achieved by small doping, as in Fe3-xMxO4 (x = Ti, Zn) when x exceeds 0.012. Samples with I and II order transition are particularly well distinguished from each other when heat capacity at TV > T is considered. In case of I order, heat capacity is considerably lower than that for II order materials, and this difference persists down to lowest temperatures (0.3 K). Neither this phenomenon nor the fact that it is not reproduced for elements other than Ti and Zn was really explained. Therefore, we plan to measure physical properties at milikekvin temperature range to see if the ground state of magnetite in these two forms (I and II order transition) is intrinsically distinct, or the difference in properties sits in strikingly different spectrum of excited states. Since already very small doping causes drastic changes in electronic properties, it can be an attractive challenge for DFT modeling.

Research facilities: The main experimental work, measurements at milikelwin temperatures, will be performed on the 3He/4He dilution refrigerated „Triton” in ACMIN. The experimental setup is equipped with data acquisition system Nanonis-Tramea, unique in Poland and specially designed for subtle quantum signals that we expect to encounter at this low T range. The measurements will comprise:

1. Measurements of magnetic susceptibility at milikelvin range,

2. Measurements of electric properties (dielectric constant) at milikelvin range,

3. Specific heat measurements at milikelvin range.

Magnetite monocrystals, stoichiometric and Ti or Zn doped, covering both first and second order regimes, will be measured; as mentioned before, these materials have, most probably, different ground state despite very small doping. Neither electric properties, nor specific heat at such a low temperatures were measured. Department of Solid State Physics of the Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science and ACMIN, both in AGH UST, cooperate in measurements using Triton dilution refrigerated; both for this setup, as well as the lab where electrical contacts will be prepared, the access of promoter and PhD student is guaranteed. The properties of a ground state in stoichiometric and doped magnetite will be calculated by the DFT method. The calculations will be performed in cooperation with the Institute of Nuclear Physics of PAS.

Number of places: 1

 

7. Electronic structure of advanced materials for energy conversion and storage.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. inż. Janusz Toboła

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Planned study of advanced materials is primarily a basic research, however, this subject belongs to the most dynamically developing areas of interdisciplinary research due to its importance for energy security and quality of life. The proposed doctoral thesis would consist in electronic structure calculations (within the framework of DFT techniques) as well as modeling of electron transport, electrochemical properties as well as crystal stability analysis of disordered systems. Application of quantum electrodynamics methods for the calculation of selected physical and chemical quantities, will allow a deeper understanding of key mechanisms responsible for conversion and / or energy storage processes, e.g. in thermoelectric or ionic batteries. Calculations of the electron structure combined, for example, with the Boltzmann transport theory, allow to determine the electron transport parameters defining electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity, thermopower or Fermi energy changes, which are key quantities in the description of thermoelectric and electrochemical phenomena. As part of their PhD thesis theoretical work would be carried out in cooperation with Polish and French experimental teams.

Research facilities: PhDs would be conducted at the Department of Condensed Matter Physics, which provides the necessary scientific and research conditions to carry out theoretical and computational research. In particular, the group of electronic structure calculations has its own computing servers, on which the quantum calculation packages are installed and can also be develloped. As part of doctoral thesis is planned to cooperate closely with the experimentalists in the field of research on Li- / Na-ion batteries (group of Prof. J. Molenda, WEiP AGH) and thermoelectric materials (group of Prof. K. Wojciechowski, WIMiC AGH)

Number of places: 3

 

8. Ab initio studies of the electron-phonon interaction and superconductivity in selected materials.

Supervisor: dr hab. inż. Bartłomiej Wiendlocha

Auxiliary supervisor:

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The work will focus on theoretical studies of the electron-phonon interaction and superconductivity in selected crystalline materials. The main issue will cover performing of numerical calculations of the electronic structure, dynamic properties and Eliashberg's function of the electron-phonon interaction using the density functional methods, for selected, real materials. The anisotropy of interactions, the influence of spin-orbit coupling on the electron-phonon interaction and the influence of these phenomena on the formation of the superconducting phase in the material will be investigated.

Research facilities: The team has 7 multiprocessor computing servers for exclusive use, which provide adequate computing power to perform the planned calculations. The work will be a part of the project NCN Sonata Bis-7 "The role of resonant states, spin-orbit coupling and disorder in superconductivity of selected materials", lead by the supervisor.

Number of places: 1

 

9. Study of spin-orbit interactions in spintronic nanostructures.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. Tomasz Stobiecki

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The aim of the study are both theoretical and experimental investigations of hybrid nanostructures: antiferromagnet/ferromagnet (AFM/FM), synthetic antiferromagnet (SAF) and topological insulators/ferromagnet (TI/FM), for maximization of spin current generated by spin–orbit interactions (SOI). In novel spintronic circuits such spin current mediates information that can be written and read using spin-orbit torque induced on ferromagnet (FM). These phenomena are going to be examined in fabricated test devices, consisting of different combinations of /AFM/FM and SAF multilayers, by dynamic measurements of the spin Hall, spin-magnetoresistance effects and current induced magnetization switching. Theoretical approaches based on quasi-classical transport equations and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation are going to be developed for further interpretation of experimental results and for estimation of optimal parameters, that govern spin-orbit-coupling induced effects in the examined systems. The results will allow for the development of novel spintronic systems.

Research facilities:

Number of places: 2

 

10. Study of electrical and magnetic properties of composites: nanoparticles - superconductor.

Supervisor: dr hab. Wiesław Marek Woch

Auxiliary supervisor: dr Ryszard Zalecki

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The main parameters of superconductors are critical temperature, critical current and critical field – irreversibility field. The optimization of these parameters is the subject of research in this area. Particularly interesting physical phenomena are observed in superconductors doped with nanoparticles, especially magnetic nanoparticles. Such systems - composites are responsible both for the so-called triplet interaction as well as for the increase of the above-mentioned parameters, in particular the increase of critical currents which is associated with a pinning force of the vortices. The study will include measurements of XRD, SEM, EDX, XRF, temperature measurements of resistance and magnetoresistance as well as measurements of magnetic susceptibility, magnetization and specific heat.

Research facilities: The Solid State Physics Department has the above-mentioned apparatus (XRD, SEM, EDX, XRF) as well as a low-temperature bridge system for measuring magnetic susceptibility and magnetoresistance (up to 5 kGs), magnetization on a vibration magnetometer to a magnetic field up 15 kGs, a system for measurements critical currents (up to 100 A) and a PPMS device with a maximum field of 90 kGs.

Number of places: 3

 

11. Advanced CMOS technologies in detector readout systems for particle physics experiments.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. inż Marek Idzik

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Mirosław Firlej

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The subject of the work will be the application of advanced submicron CMOS technologies in readout systems of detectors for high energy physics experiments. The work will include the development of dedicated ASICs (Application Specific Integrated Circuits), laboratory measurements of parameters of prototype readout systems and, if possible, measurements of the full detection path, both in the laboratory and on the test beams. As part of the work, the analysis of data collected in the lab as well as during test beams, will be performed. The work may also contain studies of the properties of advanced CMOS technologies, e.g. in the context of their radiation resistance.

Research facilities: Complete laboratory infrastructure for design and test of dedicated ASICs and detectors is available at WFiIS AGH. The superviser since many years has been involved in wide international cooperation within various high energy physics experiments, enabling the doctoral student to conduct research for these experiments.

Number of places: 1

 

12. Study of the initial stages in heavy-ion collisions.

Supervisor: dr hab. Adam Bzdak, prof. AGH

Auxiliary supervisor:

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The main goal of high energy heavy ion collision experiments is to produce the so-called quark-gluon plasma (QGP) and study its properties. Advanced calculations demonstrated that when the temperature reaches around 10^12 kelvins the known building blocks of matter, namely, protons and neutrons melt and a new state of matter emerges with quarks and gluons being the proper degrees of freedom. Experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) delivered solid experimental evidence that indeed QGP is produced in high energy heavy ion collisions. The goal of the project is to study the properties of this new state of matter.

Research facilities: A computer is needed to conduct this project. There is a possibility to obtain a scholarship from NCN.

Number of places: 1

 

13. Physical properties of selected phases in FeCrCoNi-based high entropy alloys.

Supervisor: dr hab. inż. Jakub Cieślak

Auxiliary supervisor:

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: This research problem involves studies of High-Entropy Alloys (HEA) and phase transitions which occur within their structures. HEA are defined as alloys made of at least five different elements in similar proportions. In the first try a particularly large value of configuration entropy is assumed as a stabilizing factor of the structure of these systems. In practice, however, it turns out that often one can observe at least two phases present in alloys designed this way. It is also surprising that the observed phases have relatively simple crystallographic structures, although sometimes there are also more complicated ones, such as the Laves or Frank-Kasper phases (sigma, R). Useful properties of an alloy are determined by the constituent phases (their compositions and physicochemical properties) and the configuration in which they appear (the way the phases coexist). It is important to precisely determine the physical properties of every phase and the ranges of concentration and temperature in which every phase is formed in order to design new alloys and control their properties. In the present research problem we plan to focus on three kinds of systems: AlxFeCrNiCo, TixFeCrCoNi and PdxFeCrCoNi. Pilot studies carried out have confirmed the necessity of analyzing the kinetics of phase transformations at different temperatures, investigating magnetic properties as a function of external field and temperature, as well as structural studies using diffraction methods. Simultaneously with the experiment, calculations of the electronic structure inspired by the results of experiments will be performed. In turn, the results obtained in the theoretical way will enable unambiguous interpretation of the results of experiments and will stimulate further experiments. As a result, it is planned to precisely describe the phase diagram for concentrations in which interesting phases appear, determine the activation energy of their formation and describe the magnetic structure and the temperature of the magnetic ordering.

Research facilities: Execution of the planned research requires access to measurement techniques allowing to identify crystal structures and then the atoms and their properties on the sublattices of those structures. One of such techniques is X-ray diffraction (XRD) which is the basic technique that gives information about the phase composition of a material. Its high-energy variation based on synchrotron radiation (High Energy XRD, HEXRD) operates on smaller wavelengths and ensures higher resolution. Performing HEXRD measurements is planned in cooperation with Rouen University in France. We are planning to use the method of neutron diffraction on a chosen set of samples in ILL in Grenoble. Differences in atomic scattering factors are big enough here to use the diffraction pattern not only to examine the structure but also its occupancies, and do that based on the signal from the whole volume of the sample, not the surface like in XRD technique. Phases analysis, their composition, homogeneity and relative conformity can also be studied by analyzing the surface using SEM/EDX and EBSD techniques. The authors are planning to conduct such examinations in ACMiN/AGH. A lot can be said about local ordering based on Mossbauer measurements where the state of probe atom (here 57Fe) depends primarily on its nearest neighbors (kinds of elements and their distances). Studies of this kind also provide information about hyperfine fields and electron densities and indirectly about magnetic moments. They will be done in Mossbauer Spectroscopy Laboratory in Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH. Magnetic properties measurements using VSM technique will let us establish average magnetic moments and magnetic ordering temperatures. They will be performed in cooperation with TU Wien. Together with experimental research electronic structure calculations will be done, using averaging techniques typical of disordered (CPA - Coherent Potential Approximation) as well as an original method involving computations for a large number of ordered supercells and analyzing the results taking into account probabilities of different atom configurations. The calculations will be performed on two calculation servers which together have 8 processors (88 cores) in the Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH.

Number of places: 2

 

14. Application of atmospheric circulation models for pollutants transport investigation.

Supervisor: dr hab. inż. Mirosław Zimnoch

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Michał Gałkowski

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Determination of the factors controlling high air pollution concentration require two elements: (i) information about emission sources intensity and distribution, and (ii) the knowledge of meteorological processes responsible for their atmospheric transport. The second factor is often playing a key role in the formation of so-called smog episodes. It is particularly difficult to assess this factor in areas with complex topography and land use (dense buildings, forests), where they are most often observed. The development of atmospheric circulation models and increase of high computational power availability observed over the past few years makes it possible to apply these models to the analysis of the planetary boundary layer dynamics or variability of the air mass circulation patterns. The use of high-resolution atmospheric models for analysis of urban mountainous areas may help in the identification of factors responsible for the formation of smog and can help to develop strategies leading to improvement of the environment on these areas.

Research facilities: Environmental Physics Group has experience in research concerning the influence of atmospheric dynamics on transport of air pollution and trace gases active in greenhouse effect, including the application of numerical models for assessment of planetary boundary layer dynamics and air mass circulation patterns on observed concentrations of investigated atmospheric components. Academic Computer Center Cyfronet AGH provides a required computational resources for such studies.

Number of places: 1

 

15. Novel methods of hydrological and meteorological observations.

Supervisor: dr hab inż. Mirosław Zimnoch

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Przemysław Wachniew

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Technological developments in measurement of physical quantities and chemical analyses as well as in data storage and transmission potentially improve the quality and quantity of environmental data. These possibilities are particularly important for hydrological and meteorological observations, which require collecting large amount of data with an appropriate spatial and temporal resolution. The environmental observations are also often performed in hardly accessible locations. With this respect, the new techniques, like unmanned aerial vehicles and distributed temperature sensing systems can be applied. Application of the new techniques, which were created for other uses, requires their adaptation to the specific needs of environmental research. In the fields of hydrology and meteorology the following applications can be identified, in which the application of the new techniques might contribute to the development of the scientific knowledge: groundwater-surface water interactions; spatio-temporal temperature patterns in the atmosphere, soils and waters; hydrometric measurements in rivers and surface water bodies; high-frequency variations of chemical and isotope properties of water.

Research facilities: Environmental Physics Group has an experience, equipment and performs research in the fields of quality and dynamics of waters and atmospheric air in numerous national and international research projects and closely co-operates with Polish and foreign research groups.

Number of places: 1

 

16. Mobile measurements of methane release from Oil and Gas mining sector.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. inż. Kazimierz Różański

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Jarosław Nęcki

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: According to newest scientific reports methane is most important gas concerning the action aiming against climate change. Methane release from Oil and Gas sector in Poland has a big uncertainty especially due to large amount of small leaks not reported by industrial companies. PhD project is to solve the methodology problems of small leak rate estimation using the mobile platform (UAV, car, personal access). Application of dispersion modelling and mas balance approach will help PhD with construction of reliable method to inventory and quantification of leaks.

Research facilities: Currently our group has various gas analyser for measurement of race gas amount in atmosphere and soil. Small detection limit and possibility of stable isotope analysis will be additional help for PhD in realization of the goals. Good experience with modelling and radionuclide analysis of our group members can be a hint in the beginning of the PhD work. We are taking part in few international projects and planning to apply for next one as the topic is very up to date research initiative.

Number of places: 2

 

17. Measuremnt of long-range particle correlations in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

Supervisor: dr hab. inż Tomasz Bołd

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The Particle Physics group at AGH UST conducts research at the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The matter at extreme conditions is one of studied subjects. This matter, called Quark-Gluon-Plasma consists of liberated quarks and gluons normally bound in hadrons. Existence of this state was conjectured by Quantum Chromodynamics at very high temperature and pressures. Such conditions existed fraction of a second after the “big bang” but can nowadays also be reproduce in laboratory in the heavy ions collisions at relativistic energies. Time-space evolution of the Quark-Gluon-Plasma is well described by the relativistic hydrodynamics. An intriguing feature of the evolution is emergence of collective effects. They are experimentally observed as anisotropic particle distributions of collision products. By choosing object that are studied (particle type or particle momentum) an information about the phases of aforementioned Quark-Glon-Plasma evolution can be obtained. Currently unanswered question concern presence of the Quark-Gluon-Plasma in specific collisions of projectiles as small as protons. Study of the collective effects in Quark- Gluon-Plasma will be the main subject of the doctoral study.

Research facilities: The doctoral research will be conduced within the ATLAS collaboration. That is, the group of size of few thousands scientists and engineers from nearly 4 countries and 140 institutes from across the world. By joining the ATLAS, besides the research work, every member works on the detector, software maintenance and/or assists data taking. For a new member a qualification task is assigned. After the completion of the task (after one year) a full membemshing is granted. That includes co-authorship of all ATLAS publications and possibility to present on behalf of the experiment at the conferences. During the study frequent visits to CERN should be expected. It should be added that the AGH UST Elementary Particle Physics group has significant and diverse contribution to the ATLAS experiment and many years of experience in studying the Quark-Gluon-Plasma.

Number of places: 1

 

18. Study of quark-gluon plasma and search for new particles from beyond Standard Model using hard processes in heavy-ion collisions in the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

Supervisor: dr hab. inż. Iwona Grabowska-Bołd, prof. AGH

Auxiliary supervisor:

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is a hot and dense state of matter which existed in a tiny fraction of the second after the Big Bang. To shead more light on the early evolution of the Universe, scientists produce droplets of QGP in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions in powerful accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. A subject of research is experimental work on data analysis of lead-lead, proton-lead and proton-proton collisions collected in years 2015-2018 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. To investigate properties of QGP so-called hard probes will be used such as W, Z and gamma bosons. These probes offer also an unique opportunity to study nuclear parton distribution functions and their modifications with respect to a reference proton-proton system. Another interesting topic is a broad class of photon-photon processes with a very rear light-by-light scattering which could be measured in a direct way for the first time in 2017 (4.4 sigma evidence) [Nat. Phys. 13 (2017) 852] and 2019 (8.2 sigma observation) [arXiv:1904.03536] with a leading contribution of the AGH team [link]. In particular that first observation measurement opens up new opportunities for differential analysis and also provides a tool to search for new particles predicted by various beyond Standard Model extensions.

Research facilities: Scientific research is done as part of the international collaboration with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN within the Heavy-Ion Physics Group which has been established since 2010. The ATLAS group at the AGH UST has a dedicated grant which covers paricipation fees in the experiment, as well as scientific visits to CERN to participate in the maintanence of the detector. In addition to the scientifc research a PhD student will have a contribution in the detector operation which means frequent visits to CERN to participate in data taking and meetings of working groups. After the qualification period for an author of the ATLAS Collaboration, a PhD student will be eligible to represent ATLAS with talks at international conferences. Participation in conferences will be covered by NCN grants. An extra scolarship to cover doctoral research is also possible in the grant. The ATLAS group at the AGH UST is very active in various outreach activities with Malopolska Researchers’ Night, AGH Open Days, International Masterclasses Hands-On Particle Physics, Prymusi AGH Program and many more (with a dedicated fan page on facebook Cząstki AGH). A contribution of PhD students to those activities is important.

Number of places: 1

 

19. Scattering amplitudes in Quantum Chromodynamics.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. Piotr Bożek

Auxiliary supervisor: dr Piotr Kotko

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The topic concerns theoretical studies of the fundamental theory of strong interactions – Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). One of the basic objects in the theory are scattering amplitudes, that is, the functions describing an interaction process of many quarks and gluons. The scattering amplitudes are of great importance for modern experiments in particle physics, such as Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. However, they allow not only to describe and predict outcome of experiments; it turns out that their internal mathematical structure is very rich and thus allows to better understand the structure of the QCD theory itself. The following research topic aims at utilizing and further development of recent results in theoretical physics, in particular the formulation of QCD theory in terms of the so-called MHV Lagrangian and Wilson lines. The PHD students will be however encouraged to propose and implement their own ideas, within the topic outlined above.

Research facilities: The project requires using computers/laptops and, depending on the project development an current needs, the use of cluster computing. The research will be partially conducted within the grant of the National Science Center awarded to dr Piotr Kotko. An additional fellowship of 2500 PLN per month is planned, paid over the two-year period. Further additional funding depends on the availability of funds.

Number of places: 1

 

20. Identification of biochemical markers for selected neurodegenerative and neoplastic diseases using modern spectrometric methods.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab inż. Marek Lankosz

Second supervisor: prof. dr hab. med. Dariusz Adamek

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: For many years, in collaboration with the Chair of Pathomorphology at the Jagiellonian University, research on markers of selected neurodegenerative diseases (neuromuscular diseases) and neoplastic diseases (brain and ovarian tumors) have been conducted. Investigations of elemental and biomolecular composition were used to distinguish the type of disease and the degree of their severity. The development of spectrometric methods opens new analytical possibilities and better detection of biochemical markers. This enables more effective detection of pathological processes based on biochemical analysis of tissues. In the proposed investigations, in addition to previously used methods of X-ray fluorescence microscoproscopy and infrared microscopy, it is planned to use the ion nanoprobe for elemental analysis at the subcellular level. Biomolecular imaging at the nanoscale will be implemented using nano-FTIR. This technique is a combination of high resolution atomic force microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Biomolecular analysis will be complemented by the MALDI technique (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionisation) desorption combined with measurement of mass in MS mass spectrometer. MALDI-MS is a common analytical tool especially for peptides, proteins and most other biologically active molecules ( oligonucleotides, carbohydrates, natural products and lipids). Biochemical tests of tissues will be extended to analysis of intestinal microbiota. In the digestive tract there is a huge amount of bacteria and other microorganisms, the so-called intestinal microbiota (microflora, microbiome, intestinal ecosystem). It is believed that these bacteria play an important role in maintaining the health of the entire human body. In recent years, the relationship between the composition of microbiota and the occurrence of specific diseases is underlined.

Research facilities: The laboratories at DMPB, are equipped with the apparatus necessary to carry out the proposed research. The apparatus includes an X-ray confocal fluorescent microscope for tissue elemental analysis at the cellular level, a NANOHUNTER II spectrometer for analysis of ultra-trace element concentrations, and two FTIR spectrometers: Nicolet iN10 MX and Nicolet Continuum - Thermo Scientific coupled with FTIR spectrometer Nicolet 8700. In addition, the laboratory is equipped with cabinets for storing tissues of human origin, microtome for cutting tissues for sections, apparatus for tissue mineralization and freezer for storing tissues at a temperature of -80 degrees C. In the frame of the project and cooperation with the IAEA elemental analyzes will be carried out on the proton nano-probe (Laboratory Jožef Stefan Institute, Liubljana). For molecular studies nano-FTIR at the Elettra synchrotron in Trieste and molecular analyzer MALDI-MS will be performed. The research will be financed by a project carried out in cooperation with the IAEA in Vienna and NSC grants

Number of places: 1

 

21. Study of diffraction in proton-proton collisions with the STAR detector at RHIC.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. inż. Mariusz Przybycień

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Leszek Adamczyk

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The STAR experiment at RHIC in the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, USA, started collecting data in the year 2000. RHIC allows colliding (polarized) proton or a wide range of heavy ion beams in a broad range of energies accessible in a centre-of-mass system. Staff members and doctoral students from the Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science have joined the STAR Collaboration in 2012, and since then we participate in shifts during the data taking periods, in the analyses of the collected data and in preparing publications in renowned scientific journals. Successful candidates will work on diffractive processes, in which the intact scattered protons are reconstructed in the special forward detectors (Roman Pots). In the cental rapidity region new particles are produced. One which attracts significant interest is glueball, a hypothetical particle consisted only from gluons, i.e. particles responsigle for carrying strong force. There will be also possibility to involve in other interesting research performed in the STAR experiment, including studies of the properties of Quark-Gluon Plasma.

Research facilities: As members of STAR Collaboration we have full access to the experimental data and all necessary computing infratructure at BNL. Also localy at the Faculty we have access to sufficient computing infrastructure to carry physics analyses related to the STAR experiment. Our participation in this research is fully financed by the grants provided by National Science Centre of Poland.

Number of places: 2

 

22. Hydrogen-triggered phase transitions in amorphous and quasicrystalline Ti-based alloys.

Supervisor: dr hab. Łukasz Gondek

Auxiliary supervisor: dr Joanna Czub

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The main aim of the proposed research project is to discover a nature of exotic phase transitions in amorphous hydrides in Ti-based alloys. In order to do so, detailed, complementary studies including structural, thermic and electronic properties are planned. Due to complexness of the investigated matter, the research must step beyond typical structural studies. Our group have discovered the unusual phases called “glassy quasicrystals”, appearing during thermal treatment of some amorphous hydrides of Ti-Zr-Ni composition. Therefore this was a natural motivation for investigate that exotic phases in more detailed way. In the literature, reports concerning basic properties of the amorphous hydrides are rarely presented; hence the unexplored area of knowledge is additional driving force for carry such research. In order to fill the gap, we aim at determining multi-dimensional phase diagram gathering structural, magnetic and electronic properties as a function of temperature, composition and hydrogen concentration. A formation of any phase, especially when presence/lack of translational symmetry is involved, has a certain influence on all properties. Namely, the electronic and magnetic properties will undergo significant changes, being a good measure of the structural properties, while establishing it from the typical structural research could be difficult. Thanks to complex approach, the gathered knowledge will impinge not only for the Ti-based alloys, but will bring universal results for amorphous hydrides.

Research facilities: Our research group is supported with all required equipment for synthesis and characterization of samples: arc furnace, planetary mills, precise balances, etc, X-ray powder diffractometer with low and high-temperature inserts (20-1200K); Automated Sieverts’ volumetric sorption analyzer; Scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer. Apart from above, part of the research will be made in collaboration with well-known neutron and synchrotron facilities across the Europe.

Number of places: 1

 

23. Strain induced modulation of magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic nanostructures.

Supervisor: dr hab. Tomasz Ślęzak

Auxiliary supervisor: dr Anna Kozioł-Rachwał

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Recent demonstration of magneto-transport effects in antiferromagnets (AFMs) and their ultrafast magnetization dynamics make them potential candidates that could replace ferromagnets (FMs) in spintronic devices ((V. Baltz et al. Rev. Mod. Phys. 90, 015005(2018))). In contrast to FMs, the AFMs are robust against magnetic perturbations and do not create stray fields, which is beneficial for ultimate down-size scalability and makes them a promising alternative for use as active elements in next generation data storage materials. The goal of the PhD thesis will be to grow and investigate magnetic state of antiferromagnetic thin films and FM/AFM bilayers. In particular, we aim to explore strain induced modulation of magnetic anisotropy in AFMs.

Research facilities: The project will be realized in the Nanostructures on Surfaces group in the Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science at the AGH University of Science and Technology. The experimental facilities that comprise several MBE systems for deposition of epitaxial nanostructures will be used in the project. Standard surface characterization methods, i.e. LEED/AES will be used to determine structure of prepared samples. Magneto-optic Kerr effect facility will be used to study exchange interaction between FM and AFM layers in FM/AFM system. Additionally, in- and ex-situ Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS) with the monolayer sensitivity will be exploited to study structure, composition and magnetic properties of ultrathin films that contain 57Fe isotope. To determine the spin structure of the AFM and adjacent FM layers the X-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) effects will be used. The XMLD, XMCD and XAS measurements will be made at the PEEM/XAS beamline in SOLARIS synchrotron.

Number of places: 2

 

24. Tailoring the magnetic anisotropy of antiferromagnets by proximity effects in ferromagnet/antiferromagnet epitaxial multilayers and nanostructures.

Supervisor: dr hab. Tomasz Ślęzak

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Michał Ślęzak

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Ferromagnet/antiferromagnet epitaxial multilayers and nanostructures will be studied in the project. The main target of the research will be to obtain the control over the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic state of antiferromagnetic components of the studied objects. Here their direct as well as indirect (mediated via nonmagnetic spacers) interaction with ferromagnetic building blocks will be utilized. Important part of the project includes the optimization of magnetic properties of FM components, in such a way that their magnetic impact on proximate AFM blocks is the highest. FM/AFM systems with magnetic properties optimal for potential magnetic data recording technology will be fabricated.

Research facilities: Majority of the research tasks will be performed in UHV system at the AGH University of Science and Technology. Besides basic structural and chemical analysis using LEED and AES the magnetic properties of the samples will be studied with both in situ and ex situ magneto-optic Kerr effect facilities. In addition, numerous synchrotron measurements at SOLARIS National Synchrotron Radiation Centre in Kraków are foreseen.

Number of places: 1

 

25. Skin biophysics - computer modelling in diagnostics and therapy.

Supervisor: dr hab. Zenon Matuszak

Second supervisor: dr hab. Piotr Kowalski

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The proposed topic is a part of a larger project aimed at description and computer modelling of pigmentation processes in human skin, including the formation, diagnosis and therapy of tumours from the group of melanomas. Issues directly included in the scope of the doctoral theses cover a wide range of subjects. The problems in the field of physics (more precisely: biophysics) include light transport in pigmented tissues, simulation of melanogenesis and photodynamic therapy of cancer. Bioinformatics aspects are present especially in the issues of regulation of gene expression in melanogenesis and in the analysis of images of pigmentation lesions for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. In order to solve these problems, we will use classical simulation methods such as solving ordinary and partial differential equations (including reaction-diffusion equations), Monte Carlo simulations and dynamic optimization theory as well as neural networks and image recognition techniques.

Research facilities: The Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science has appropriate IT resources necessary to carry out the proposed research, such as computers, software and databases. The supervisors have experience in issues related to the proposed topic.

Number of places: 2

 

26. Interactions of functionalized metallic nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes with model membrane systems and natural biological membranes. Investigations on the molecular level.

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. Květoslava Burda

Second supervisor: prof dr hab. n. med. Grzegorz Gajos

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Recent epidemiological studies have shown a high correlation between exposure to metallic nanoparticles MNPs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the incidence of life-threatening cardiovascular events. The influence of NPs on human health is a big concern. The action of MNPs and CNTs on erythrocytes may underlie many so-called diseases of civilization (e.g. circulatory diseases or type 2 diabetes). We are going to study action of different types of MNPs and CNTs, especially those that are already in common use, and to compare the effects that they have on RBCs from healthy individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim of the studies is to establish a direct cellular and molecular impact of selected MNPs and CNTs which our environment is permanently exposed, on RBCs functioning. We are going to concentrate on ion transport through the cell membrane, stability of the membrane skeleton and hemoglobin oxygen affinity. We will apply many complementary biochemical and biophysical techniques (for example: absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy AFM).

Research facilities: Example experimental methods available in the Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics and Bioenergetics (WFiIS AGH): absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence with double modulation, thermoluminescence, fast polarography, vertical and horizontal electrophoresis systems, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Mössbauer spectroscopy in cooperation with ICSC PAS in Krakow. More details on: www.fis.agh.edu.pl/kfmib/department/scientific-equipment/molecular-biophysics-and-bioenergetics/ The laboratory has permission to work with isolated cells.

Number of places: 1

 

27. Characterisation of new semiconductor structures for precise tracking sensors in experimental high energy physics using TCT scanning technique.

Supervisor: dr hab. inż. Tomasz Szumlak

Auxiliary supervisor: dr inż. Agnieszka Obłąkowska-Mucha

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Nowadays the answer to the question what the Universe made of and what is the fundamental structure of particles can be obtained with the huge laboratories which provide collisions of high energy particles. The deep insight into the structure of matter is possible if the density of collision energy is pushed forward to the highest limits. The research program of CERN (European Council for Nuclear Research in Geneva) started in the ‘50s last century and will be continued at least until the year 2035. The instruments used at CERN are purpose-built particle accelerators and detectors. Beams of particles are accelerated to high energies before they are made to collide with each other or with stationary targets. Detectors observe and record the results of these collisions. In the centre of each experiment the silicon tracking detectors are situated. Its main aim is to provide the track coordinates that will be used for the reconstruction of the production and decay vertices. Therefore they are under influence of the highest flux of particles originating from the collisions. The excellent parameters of silicon sensors tend to worsen in time and radiation eventually prompts the need of their replacement. Currently a study on the novel radiation hard techniques are conducted for the new CERN experiments. They aim either on the mitigating of the destructive effects or on the construction of new structures which would operate efficiently with fluence up to 1017 neq/cm2. One of the method of verification of the new solutions is Transient Charge Technique (TCT). This is a method of  reconstruction the electric field in silicon sensors. The method is based on the reconstruction of current profiles induced by a red or infrared laser. The TCT apparatus is in our laboratory at AGH and the research just started with the cooperation with CERN and the leading  laboratories that specialize in the novel silicon structures. It is worth noting that the same solutions are applied in the researches of the cosmic space and in the hadron therapy in medicine.

Research facilities: The silicon properties of silicon structures can be studied with Transient Charge Technique (TCT). This is a method of  reconstruction the electric field in silicon sensors.  A red or infrared laser is used for the induction of the signal by ionization of the sensor bulk. Strong laser pulses are directed towards the detector edge, perpendicular to the strips. Scans across the detector thickness enables measurement of the induced current at given depth and then – drift velocity, thus the electric filed, and charge collection profiles. This remarkable method is commonly used  for study substrate properties before and after irradiation at different bias voltage. In all the cases Edge-TCT method gauges the electric field with high spatial resolution determining this way whether the sensor is fully depleted . It can also resolve the composition of the measured current (drift or diffusion, electron or holes) providing valuable information on the  processes that occurred after irradiation.  The completely assembled TCT setup was placed last year in our laboratory and we just started the research with the cooperation of CERN and other laboratories within the RD50 Collaboration RD50 (Radiation hard semiconductor devices for very high luminosity colliders).
Currently we have a scientific grant founded by the National Centre of Science (NCN) and plan to run for next one when this is finalised. 

Number of places: 1

 

28. 4-d tracking algorithms using computational intelligence techniques for experimental high energy physics.

Supervisor: dr hab. inż. Tomasz Szumlak

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: High energy physics experiments are constantly being upgraded and getting more and more complicated. Thus, both the detection techniques and software must also follow at a very aggressive pace. The next LHC machine upgrade, that will significantly increase the instantaneous luminosity, is foreseen to become operational in 2022 will put especially high pressure on the detector physics and data analysis fields. After the modernisation for each proton beams crossing there will be up to one hundred proton-proton interactions that will yield massive amounts of charged particles (more than one thousand). The currently employed approaches for reconstruction and triggering will not be sufficient to process such amounts of raw data – especially high efficiency and purity primary vertex reconstruction will not be feasible. A simple increase of detector granularity (number of active readout channels) cannot solve this problem without adding a precise timing information to each track. The present trends aim at providing technologies that will be able of both – giving a precise space coordinate and time stamp. A major work package is currently under way to check if the LGAD silicon structures can be used for precise 4D tracking purposes. At the same time new reconstruction algorithms must be provided that will be able to process this 4D data points. AGH-LHCb/RD50 group is currently involved in designing new types of detector devices and test them using the TCT (Transient Current Technique) scanner and implementing new algorithms suitable for 4D track reconstruction.

Research facilities: AGH-LHCb/RD50 group has significant computing resources (dedicated servers) for TCAD simulation of the new silicon structures for active sensor devices and data analysis. We also have a complete TCT scanning device that is currently one of the most popular and reliable experimental technique for new sensors prototyping. Using the TCT device it is possible to map electric field inside the semiconductor structure and measure the mobility of charge carriers (electrons and holes). We just started a new grant OPUS (NSC) that foresee a dedicated position for a PhD student within the research team.

Number of places: 1

 

29. Contribution to design and construction of the 3-d active detector for the spatial radiation dose measurement and implementation of the DAQ system.

Supervisor: dr hab. inż. Tomasz Szumlak

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: The research topic is strongly related to the project of building, testing, optimization and validation of the measurement system used for reconstruction of the radiation dose generated by the for radiotherapy instruments. In this research problem, particular emphasis will be put on the development of an efficient and precise data acquisition system for reading and controlling the detection device. The key element of the research will be to identify all necessary factors determining the correct and safe operation of the system as a whole (technical and physical) and take them into account during design and verification work, and in actual measuring campaigns, in particular, the test-beam periods. Actual dose measurements are to be the final confirmation of both the correctness of the system operation and a full understanding of its functioning at all even very basic levels (eg at the level of ionizing radiation interactions with matter along with the side effects of these interactions). The detector specific tasks the future candidate will be a part of the team responsible for analysing the physical properties of the active matrix filled with the liquid scintillator. The most important challenges related to the performance of the phantom are detection efficiency and sensitivity, possible cross-talk among the individual active cells and its mitigation, technique of coupling the cell with optical fibre, etc. A crucial question that will need to be answered is the optimisation of the volume and shape of the individual detector voxels. This part of the project will require very close collaboration with the team responsible for the simulation of the radiation interactions with matter.

Research facilities: AGH WFiIS has laboratories for testing and development of ionizing radiation detectors, integrated circuits and data acquisition systems. In the labs, it is possible to assemble and test detectors, specialized integrated circuits, and equipped with the necessary equipment to build dedicated data acquisition systems. In particular, there are X-ray detectors, X-ray tubes with power supplies for generating X-ray beams, FPGAs, signal generators, oscilloscopes, logic analyzers, specialized software for designing and simulating of the hardware systems, and rich computer infrastructure. Also, for the detector specific part we are preparing a dedicated laboratory for liquid scintillator preparation, storage and handling. The described research tasks are part of the grant funded by European Union and managed by Foundation for Polish Science in the scope of the “Team-NET” project.

Number of places: 2

 

30. Study of heavy-ion collisions with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

Supervisor: prof. dr hab. inż. Mariusz Przybycień

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: ATLAS experiment is one of four big experiments curently operating at the LHC accelerator at CERN. In LHC beams of protons and/or heavy ions are collided at highest energies ever available. We propose to study jets production in heavy ion collisions as probes of the Quark-Gluon Plasma, a new state of matter produced in these collisions. The other possible subject is study of the so called ultraperipheral collisions of heavy ions in which the effective interaction proceeds via exchange of quasi-real photons.

Research facilities: As members of the ATLAS Collaboration we have full access to the experimental data and all necessary computing infratructure at CERN and on GRID. Also localy at the Faculty we have access to sufficient computing infrastructure to carry out physics analyses related to the ATLAS experiment. Our participation in this research is fully financed by the grants provided by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education and by the National Science Centre of Poland.

Number of places: 2

 

31. The use of selected dosimetry methods in the verification of radiotherapy treatment plans

Supervisor: dr hab.inż. Aleksandra Jung

Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science

Abstract: Many dosimetric procedures are used in radiotherapy, also in the scope of verifying the correctness of the prepared radiotherapy treatment plan. One of the possibilities is the use of thermoluminescent detectors to verify complex treatment plans using the Alderson phantom. In this case, it is necessary to ensure the least possible uncertainty of the measurement procedure. For this purpose, the influence of measurement method on the stability of detectors should be examined, starting from the type of thermoluminescent detectors used, through the parameters of reading and annealing, and ending with the assessment of the external factors influence. It will be also important to compare the obtained results with the standard methods used in the clinics.

Research facilities:  At the Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry of the Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science of the AGH University of Science and Technology in Kraków there are suitable measuring devices for heating and reading thermoluminescent detectors as well as various types of thermoluminescent detectors.

Number of places: 1