04.04.2022

Quark Matter 2022 International Conference


Between April 4 and 10, 2022, at the JU Auditorium Maximum, the 29th Quark Matter International Conference will take place. The organisers of the event are the AGH UST Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, the JU Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, and the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences. During the conference, Artur Konrad Ekert, Professor at the National University of Singapore and the University of Oxford, will present his special lecture* on quantum technologies.

Quark Matter is an international conference on strongly interacting matter under extreme temperature conditions, formed in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. The conference brings together theoretical and experimental physicists from around the world to discuss new developments in high-energy heavy-ion physics. The participants will talk about the fundamental issues related to strongly interacting matter under extreme conditions and emergent QCD phenomena in high-multiplicity collisions.

The conference showcases the most recent results of experimental research carried out in some of the most famous laboratories in the world, such as CERN (Switzerland) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), as well as the latest theoretical works focusing on explaining the complexities of such matter.

Physicists and doctoral students from the AGH UST Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science will present the results of their theoretical and experimental work based on the data collected during ATLAS and LHC experiments.

Detailed information is available on the conference website.

*Special lecture given by Artur Konrad Ekert, Professor at the National University of Singapore and the University of Oxford, titled Quantum Technologies, will take place online on April 4, 2022, at 17:30. To participate in the talk, register using this link.

Artur Konrad Ekert, a Jagiellonian University graduate, is a Polish-British theoretical physicist working on the foundations of quantum mechanics and quantum information processing. For his work on the use of entanglement in cryptography, he was awarded the Maxwell Medal in 1995 and the Hughes Medal in 2007 by the Royal Society.